“How much do you weigh” is not thought to be the best way to start a conversation. In fact, with the female populace it could be an outright dangerous proposal. Amongst RV’ers, however, it can be a relaxed and accepted topic of conversation and indeed, a rather important one too. You see, how much you weigh can lead to other exciting topics such as tire pressure or loading options which will not only add years to the lifetime of your home, but can improve gas mileage and “save your butt” on the downhills. An overloaded RV can even void an insurance claim, so that’s all the more reason to know your numbers. So, how does one actually do this with a behemoth such as ours?

Well, the easiest way to weigh something is to place it on a scale. As it turns out that’s exactly what you do with an RV. You just need really, really big scales and a wide area to drive the monster onto. In to save the day come the truckers. These folks have been weighing for years, and their scales are actually open to anyone. Many of the major truck-stops such as Flying J’s or Pilots will have them (or you can look up your nearest CAT scale location here) and most of them will weigh front and rear axles independently. So, just mosey on in between the truckers, squeeze your rear wheels onto the scale and ask to be weighed. $9 and 5 minutes later you’ll have your poundage in all it’s glory.

As it turns out we weigh 11,820 lbs on our front axle and 20,400 lbs on our rear axle and that’s with 3/4 tank full of fresh water and LP and a full load of gas….almost fully-loaded so to speak. A quick reference to the RV manual lets us know we need to keep 105 psi  of pressure in in our two front tires and 92 psi in each of our 4 rear tires for optimal performance. So, that’s how we keep our butts in shape, RV-speaking.

Our svelte 32,220 lb monster in all her glory

Our weight certificate from the CAT scales in Quartzite, AZ

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the product links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. That said, I only ever recommend products or services I personally use and love! Wheelingit is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

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4 Responses to A Weighty Matter – RV weights, tire pressure and such

  1. […] want to check tire pressure to make sure it’s where it should be. Correct pressure depends on your weight, but big tires tend to lose pressure with temperature and altitude changes, so it’s a good […]

  2. […] or underinflation. The right tire pressure is individual and depends entirely on your weight, as we’ve covered previously, and you want to check it regularly. We had the beast weighed early on and check tire pressure […]

  3. […] all things like water, fuel, propane, you etc. that you plan to carry on a regular basis) and get it weighed. Then you can do the math to figure out how much you can tow. Outside of GCWR, obviously a lighter […]

  4. […] we weighed our rig (front/back totals) back when we first got it and have always been careful about maintaining our tires we’d never had 4-corner weigh […]

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