Know your farmer, know your food 

I consider myself a pretty hard-core foodie. Not the high-flying-restaurant type, but the gourmet-home wine-and-diner with ingredients that  pop with flavour and nutrients that enhance my handsome frame (or so I like to think anyway). Travelling in an RV hasn’t changed any of that, and in fact it’s provided opportunities for locavoring (= buying local) which we didn’t have before. 

One thing we’re particularly passionate about is grass-fed (pasture) meat. Most people these days have no connection at all with where their meat comes from and in general, given the conditions (CAFO’s) in which most meat is raised, it’s a type of blissful ignorance. Our grazing herds…bison, lamb, cows are all ruminants meant to eat grass. By eating grass these glorious creatures not only stay healthy and happy, but they contribute to building precious top-soil. It’s beyond organic….it’s true sustainable farming. 

In Dakota Harvest Farm and farmer Bob we found soul-mates in this quest for the best. Bob raises 100% grass-fed Dorper lambs on his property just outside Sioux City. We spent the early afternoon at his farm seeing his sheep grazing in the open fields and talking about grass-fed farming, crazy USDA rules and raising healthy animals. The good news is the trend is growing. Bob’s sells locally at Farmer’s Markets and restaurants and can barely keep up with demand. The people who know, know it’s good. 

So, if you’re in the area drop by and visit Bob at his farm. Or, find your next RV stop here:  http://www.eatwild.com/. It’s well worth the time to know your farmer. 

Paul and Bob chat on Dakota Farm pastures

Part of the flock on the fields

Tagged with:
 

2 Responses to Locavoring in Iowa – Dakota Harvest Farm

  1. rvfulltimers says:

    That’s why I always love reading your blog. You camp like we do. Remote, away from crowds. Not necessarily where everyone else does.
    We recently went from beef to pasture fed bison. YUM. The ground bison, and the steaks are excellent.

  2. [...] lot about our food-source and I’ve blogged about it several times in the past (here, here and here). Eggs are no exception, and the fact that mass-producers who pack chickens together in [...]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.